Products > Crystallization Screens > GRAS Screens > GRAS Screen™ 7 • GRAS Screen™ 8

GRAS Screen™ 7 • GRAS Screen™ 8

Applications

  • GRAS reagent crystallization screen for proteins, including monoclonal antibodies, where Salt is the primary reagent, sampling pH 4.5 to 10.
  • Identify GRAS based reagents that promote crystallization of biotherapeutics for bioprocess, bioformulation, and continuous flow manufacturing applications.

Features

  • Developed at Hampton Research
  • Generally Recognized As Safe reagent formulation
  • Samples pH 4.5 to 10; 8 unique buffers
  • Primary crystallization reagent:
  • GRAS 7: Ammonium - acetate, chloride, citrate, formate, phosphate, sulfate, tartrate, Potassium phosphate, & Sodium acetate
  • GRAS 8: Sodium - chloride, citrate, formate, phosphate & tartrate
  • Vapor diffusion, microbatch, free interface diffusion
  • Reagents soluble between 4°C and 30°C
  • Antibody crystallization screen

Description

GRAS Screen™ 7 and 8 were developed by Hampton Research for the crystallization of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies.

Each of the chemicals in GRAS Screen 7 and 8 has been used under one or more of the following categories. As (1) a Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) substance, (2) a pharmaceutical excipient, (3) a normal physiological constituent, (4) a metabolic byproduct, and/or (5) a Everything Added to Food in the United States (EAFUS) substance.

GRAS Screen 7 samples 9 salts (Ammonium-acetate, chloride, citrate, formate, phosphate, sulfate, tartrate, Potassium phosphate, & Sodium acetate) at 4 concentrations, sampling 8 unique buffers (pH 4.5 to 10.0) as well as 8 buffer controls without salt. GRAS Screen 7 is supplied in a 96 Deep Well block format and is compatible with robotic and multi-channel pipet liquid handling systems. GRAS Screen 7 is compatible with vapor diffusion, free interface diffusion, and microbatch crystallization methods. For research use only.

GRAS Screen 8 samples 5 salts (Sodium - chloride, citrate, formate, phosphate & tartrate) at 4 concentrations, sampling 8 unique buffers (pH 4.5 to 10.0). GRAS Screen 8 is supplied in a 96 Deep Well block format and is compatible with robotic and multi-channel pipet liquid handling systems. GRAS Screen 8 is compatible with vapor diffusion, free interface diffusion, and microbatch crystallization methods. For research use only.



CAT NO

HR2-457

NAME

GRAS Screen 7

DESCRIPTION

1 ml, Deep Well block format

PRICE

$144.00

CAT NO

HR2-458

NAME

GRAS Screen 8

DESCRIPTION

1 ml, Deep Well block format

PRICE

$144.00

Support Material(s)

Related Item(S)

References

1. Optimization of crystallization conditions for biological macromolecules. Alexander McPherson and Bob Cudney. Acta Crystallographica Section F Volume 70, Issue 11, pages 1445-1467, November 2014.

2. Crystallization of intact monoclonal antibodies. Harris LJ, Skaletsky E, McPherson A. Proteins. 1995 Oct;23(2):285-9.

3. Crystalline monoclonal antibodies for subcutaneous delivery. Yang MX1, Shenoy B, Disttler M, Patel R, McGrath M, Pechenov S, Margolin AL. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jun 10;100(12):6934-9.

4. Fast and Scalable Purification of a Therapeutic Full-Length Antibody Based on Process Crystallization. Dariusch Hekmat et al, Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. 110, No. 9, September, 2013.

5. Towards Protein Crystallization as a Process Step in Downstream Processing of Therapeutic Antibodies: Screening and Optimization at Microbatch Scale. Yuguo Zang et al, PLoS One. 2011; 6(9): e25282.

6. Crystallization as a tool for bioseparation. Bob Cudney, Am Biotechnol Lab. 1994 Jun;12(7):42.

7. Large-scale crystallization of proteins for purification and formulation. Hekmat D. Bioprocess Biosyst Eng. 2015 Jul;38(7):1209-31. doi: 10.1007/s00449-015-1374-y

8. Using X-Ray Crystallography to Simplify and Accelerate Biologics Drug Development. Brader ML, Baker EN, Dunn MF, Laue TM, Carpenter JF. J Pharm Sci. 2017 Feb;106(2):477-494. doi: 10.1016/j.xphs.2016.10.017.

9. Excipients and Their Role in Approved Injectable Products: Current Usage and Future Directions. Sandeep Nema and Ronald J. Brendell, PDA J Pharm Sci and Tech 2011, 65 287-332.